The Mullichain Cafe

The Quay St Mullins, Saint Mullins, Ireland
Coffee Shop
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Opening Hours

Tuesday
11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday
11:00 - 17:00
Thursday
11:00 - 17:00
Friday
11:00 - 17:00
Saturday
00:00 - 00:00, 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday
00:00 - 00:00, 11:00 - 17:00

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Timeline Photos

Did You Know ? The Normans arrive in St Mullins A Norman army of 200 Knights and foot soldiers arrived in St Mullins in 1169 under the command of Maurice De Prendergast a Flemish knight sent to Ireland by StrongBow.He came to meet Domnall Mac Gilla Pátric the Irish chieftain of Osraige( known today as Co Kilkenny) at the round Tower, to swear a treaty at the Alter of St Moling. Maurice had arrived in Ireland with his troops to assist Diarmait Mac Murchada King of Leinster regain his kingdom which he had lost to the Leinster chieftains. The deal was that Muarice was to receive a lordship for his troubles but Diarmait was happy just to use the Normans as mercenaries giving nothing in return,Maurice was having none of it and decided to return to Wales with his Flemish troops, Diarmait sent his son to destroy the Maurice’s troops but he was afraid to engage them in a full battle as the Normans were heavily armed and a much superior force . The chief men of Osraige and the Flemish knights took advantage of the fact that they were in a village which contained the alter and shrine of St Moling to swear faith to one another in the presence of the saint. In particular,Domnall Mac Gilla Patraic swore that he would never betray Maurice and his men, so long as they were allies and he was unlikely to break his oath as he feared the wrath of St Moling, that’s another story .

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Timeline Photos

Kids all safely back in school come on down to The Mullicháin Cafe ,Its your Time to relax

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Timeline Photos

Get on your Bike and Cycle The Barrow Path Many thanks to Carlow Weather for the Shot

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Timeline Photos

Great shot from Carlow Weather

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Timeline Photos

Get on your walking shoes and soak up the rest of August

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Timeline Photos

The Sun Always Shines Down at The Mullicháin Cafe

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Timeline Photos

Our Carlow Rose all set to take The Rose of Tralee by Storm

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Timeline Photos

Stunning Bank Holiday Sunday Morning down at The Mullicháin Cafe

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Timeline Photos

Did You Know ? The Viking Raids on St Mullins When the river Barrow falls as the tide goes out, rocks appear at the bend just below the Mill, known locally as the “Scar” a Viking name for weir. “Around the swelling waters a graceful swallow glides As the ever patient Herron awaits the falling tides. Shadows of raiding Viking ships about the scar appear The clash of swords, the shouts men, the ancient smell of fear.” The Vikings used the rivers to raid inland Ireland and were very fond of monasteries as that was where the wealth of the country lay. Rape, pillage and Plunder was their game and they struck fear into the natives as no mercy was shown. In 824 a large fleet of Vikings sailed up the Barrow from Waterford to St Mullins and plundered the monastery of St Moling (Four Masters). In 888 Riagan,son of Dunghal defeated the Vikings at St Mullins after which 200 hundred heads were left behind. In 915 The Chiefs of Liphe of “Broad Deeds” waged a battle with the Vikings leaving 500 heads in the valley over Tigh –Moling St Mullins. The Irish were no Angles and great men for counting the heads of their enemies. [Annals of the Four Masters, Vol 2. pp 590-1] AD 951 Teach Moling was plundered by Laraic from Waterford the same fellow that Waterford is named after Port –Lairge .

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Timeline Photos

Great Times in St Mullins

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Timeline Photos

A Motte-and-Bailey castle is a fortification with a wooden or stone keep situated on a raised earthwork called a Motte, accompanied by an enclosed courtyard, or bailey, surrounded by a protective ditch and palisade A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Local folklore in St Mullins believes that the mound is the burial place of an ancient warrior. The Normans arrived in St Mullins 1179 and may have used the already existing Tumulus to build their Motte and Bailey the only way to really know is to dig up the mound, if you dare!

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Timeline Photos

The Weather is on the Up ! See you down in St Mullins

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Timeline Photos

Come out and treat yourself at the Mullicháin Cafe

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Timeline Photos

A grand Walk from Graiguenamanagh

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Photos from The Mullichain Cafe's post

Get on your Bike and cycle down to St Mullins, Bike Hire at The Waterside in Graiguenamanagh ,See you at The Mullicháin Cafe

Photos from The Mullichain Cafe\u0027s post

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